The Roundup: April 2017

Every month we spend some time scouring the web for some of the best classic car stories so you don’t have to. In this month’s installment of The Roundup, we link you to articles about the mythic, multi-fuel Model T, “Smiling” Ralph Mulford’s record-breaking 1916 Hudson Super-Six, the story behind the man who created the electric vehicle starter and more.

The Myth Of The Multi-Fuel Model T

[source: hemmings.com]

Put down that gallon of kerosene and step away from the Model T. Contrary to popular belief, Henry Ford’s groundbreaking car only runs on one thing: gasoline. Hemmings Daily contributor, Daniel Strohl, gets to the bottom of a longstanding legend that seemingly has little basis in fact. Click here to read the full story.

The Record-Breaking Hudson Super-Six

[source: theoldmotor.com]

Always the source for entertaining and informative stories—and rare vintage pictures—from the automotive past, The Old Motor remembers “Smiling” Ralph Mulford this month and the story behind his record-breaking 1916 Hudson.  A super-fast car back in the day, the Super-Six set numerous distance and speed records with Mulford behind the wheel. Check out the full story by clicking here.

Sideways Sidewinder Dragsters Explained

[source: hotrod.com]

“In the golden age of drag racing,” writes Hot Rod Network contributor Thom Taylor, “the variety of surrealistic machines was challenged only by one’s ability to process the cornucopia of crazy contraption and beautiful blitzers unleashed on the quarter mile.” So begins a wonderful retrospective on the strange-looking dragsters that many once believed would revolutionize quarter-mile racing. Click here for the full story.

No More Yanky The Cranky

 

[source: automotivehalloffame.org]

On April 17, 1911, inventor Automotive Hall of Fame inductee Charles Kettering applied for a U.S. patent for his electric vehicle starter. Kettering’s electric starter eliminated the need for a crank handle to manually start early automobiles and quickly became compulsory equipment on vehicles all over the world. This month, the AHF brings readers the story behind what is, arguably, one of the most important inventions in automotive history. Click here to read the full story.

The “Insane Packaging” Of The First Car To Break 400 MPH

[source: jalopnik.com]

There’s never been a car like it before or since, which is reason enough to take a look at the story behind the Railton Mobil Special. The futuristic-looking car—even by modern standards—was built specifically to set land-speed records in 1938. And, boy, did it do the job. Click here for the complete story.

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