Sound Off



August 24, 2011

What are the best and worst states when it comes to the rights of historic vehicle enthusiasts?  The Historic Vehicle Association invites you to voice your opinion online.

Emissions and safety inspections…plates and registration fees…use restrictions. When it comes to states friendly to historic vehicle ownership, some criteria are easier than others to quantify. Harder to determine, but no less important, is the general climate. What are the social attitudes impacting historic vehicle ownership in your state or local community? The Historic Vehicle Association would like to hear from you.

Please click here  to share your thoughts and look for results set to be published in the “HVA Section” of the winter issue of Hagerty Magazine.

 

Comments

  1. Bart Evans towanda pa.

    Need more information on this . And how do we make laws better in other states .

  2. Bill Jabs Oregon

    Oregon allows use of non-ethanol fuel in any vehichle (although it is hard to find), is a no sales tax state and has a one time $60 license fee for vehicles over 25 years old. In general, it is a good state to own historic vehicles.

  3. david babson Lee's summit missouri

    I think Missouri is OK when it come to collector cars. I can still buy unleaded premium(non ethanol) Inspections don't penalize me for my old car, No smog test yet in K.C.metro so thats a plus. No tax grabs on value of old cars. Hopefully it will continue this way

  4. eli Portland Oregon

    Here in Oregon all vehicles older than 1974 do not have to do emision tests. When I regestered my 1970 Camaro(it was from washington) they had to do a VIN inspection. The DMV guy was very happy I got this car on the road. I would say that oregon is friendly to older cars....with the exception of ethanol in the fuel!!!

  5. Bob Leinen Dearborn, MI

    Michigan is pretty good when it comes to antique/vintage car regulations. For example, the registration fee for classic cars is a one time fee of $5.00 for one owner. Additionally, we get a break on insurance with the stipulation that the vehicle only be used for club events, car shows, parades, etc. but not for daily driver use. This is reasonable to a degree; however, the state fails to recognize that antique/classic cars require maintanance just like their modern day counterparts. Ther are no provisions to legally drive your car to a dealer or service center for necesaary services such as tune-ups, lubrication, oil changes, mechanical repairs, etc.

  6. G. Alvin Wilmington, NC

    Probably common knowledge by now, but for the last couple of years NC DMV has gotten downright stupid on their interpretation of existing title laws. Clerks turned "cops," complete with Glock nine MM strapped onto their belts and tin horn badges are left by their supervisors to determine what old vehicle title is and isn't legitimate. These alleged inspectors can be brutal in their rulings as regards an old car, and there seems to be no consistency to any of the many, (and apparently totally subjective,) views of the already convoluted laws. In short, it is a nightmare to register and title an old vehicle in NC.

  7. LARRY BROTZMAN MISSISSIPPI

    Don't know enough about my states laws and the laws of other states.

  8. David Tampa Bay, Florida

    The good: Favorable emissions/safety inspections (none!) Great driving weather 2/3 of the year "In season" enthusiast events while the rest of the collector car world (except Scottsdale) is in hibernation, including the Cavallino Classic and Amelia Island Many great racetracks with plenty of weekend track days - including Sebring! The bad: Boring roads Terrible rainy weather 1/3 of the year Sub-par drivers

  9. Jim Kelly Murrieta, Ca. 82562

    California has to be the worst State for historical Vehicle ownership. The 30 year rule, which was fair, went by the way side. Now any vehicle from 1976 or above has to go through emission testing. Just recently the DMV license plate fees went up on historical vehicle and horseless carriage plates. They were even talking about having to smog all vehicles in California!! How do you smog a Model A? I think the State of California, is trying to do away with all older cars. They do not see the historical value of these cars. The state would prefer just to scrap any older cars, then to save them!! The Federal Govt. is just as bad, with the cash for old junkers. Just think of all the good parts that got destroyed, in that buy out. Thanks, to the State of California, and the Federal Government, the old car hobby is just fading away. At least in this State!!

  10. Dale Binsberger Stafford Springs, CT

    CT has a registration system that is friendly to antique and classic cars 25 years and older. They are only assessed the cars at a maximum of $500.00 each to keep the personal property taxes to a minimum. E10 fuel is still a problem and wil continue because it is federally subsidized and is more profitable for corn farmers then producing food.

  11. Bill Sturm Michigan

    In Michigan, we must pay uninsured motorist fees on every vehicle that we own, even though we can only drive one at a time. This adds over $100/year for each insured vehicle.

  12. Bernard Maryland

    Maryland is friendly to vintage automobiles. Vehicles older than 25 years are eligible for Historic tags at $51 for two years. No safety or emissions inspections initially or while so registered. Restriction is simply "not for daily use". Quite a few car clubs in the Washington, DC suburbs. The general prosperity of the area has many historic vehicles from a wide variety of marques. Perhaps more imported and obscure manufacturers represented here due to many citizens having experienced living abroad. Numerous car shows and rides benefiting local charities maintain a favorable image among the public.

  13. Jim Arnett Richardson, TX

    Here is the wording direct from the Texas DMV for vehicles registered as Antique: "Antique license plates are issued for cars, trucks or motorcycles that are at least 25 years old and are a collector’s item. The vehicle must be used exclusively for exhibitions, club activities, parades or other functions of public interest. Vehicles displaying Antique plates may not be used for regular transportation or carry advertising. The vehicle may be driven to and from a location for routine maintenance." Antique vehicles are regiatered for 5-year periods for a total fee of $50, do not require annual safety inspections. Owners may choose to use an old license plate consistent with the model year of the vehicle and display a small DMV sticker for the current registration

  14. Chris Solari Graham, NC

    Over the past 13 years I've lived in NC and Va and had my '69 Camaro registered in both states. Here's 2 nice benefits available to owners of classic cars owners in each state: In North Carolina, cars over 25 years old don't have to undergo the annual mandatory state safety inspection and emissions testing, saving you $30/yr. In Virginia, if you have a car over 25 years old and you find a pair of matching vintage Virginia license plates (at a flea-market or antique store for example), that match the year of your car, you can register them to your car for a one-time fee that's good for as long as you keep those plates on that particular car, and you never have to pay an annual plate renewal fee again. (saves you about $25/yr)

  15. Louis Harris Dallas, Texas

    Texas, so far, has been OK. Our registration is liberal. Our fees are satisfactory for Antique and Classic plates with a good choice of options. Antique registration eliminates the annual inspection. Automobiles over 25 years old have a limited inspection. Fees are satisfactory on this as well. The old car climate in Texas is good. I hope it stays that way. We don't crush everything in sight either.

  16. Wolfgang kupka Los Angeles

    High cost of registration.

  17. Charles Rowin Phoenix, Arizona

    Arizona is the best state for classic cars. Arizona is the best state for individual rights too.

  18. John Roberts San Marcos, Texas

    The Texas state government is kind to collector cars as others have mentioned, but the cops are not. You'd better know your old car rights here because policemen do not. I have been pulled over for no inspection sticker, no shoulder strap, and by cops who thought I was only allowed to drive my car in a parade. Their purpose here is not to "serve and protect", it is to generate money for the state.

  19. Bob Phoenix, AZ

    I have not been able to find a gas station in the metro Phoenix area that sells a "NO ethanol fuel"

  20. Paul Buller Enid Oklahoma

    I believe every gas station in my town has no-ethanol fuel. In fact they advertize it proudly on their signs. We have no inspections for any car in Oklahoma. Just insurance and regisration is all you need. Unlike our Texas neighbors we only have to purchase one tag for the rear of our car and a personalized tag is only 25 dollars. I believe our laws are exceptional.

  21. Paul Buller Enid Oklahoma

    I believe every gas station in my town has no-ethanol fuel. In fact they advertize it proudly on their signs. We have no inspections for any car in Oklahoma. Just insurance and regisration is all you need. Unlike our Texas neighbors we only have to purchase one tag for the rear of our car and a personalized tag is only 25 dollars. I believe our laws are exceptional.

  22. Bill Maine

    I haven't had a problem at all in Maine. Just have to register the vehicle as an antique or an everyday driver. If you go antique, you don't need a vehicle inspectuion done. Maine only sells fuel with ethanol :(

  23. Bill Maine

    I haven't had a problem at all in Maine. Just have to register the vehicle as an antique or an everyday driver. If you go antique, you don't need a vehicle inspectuion done. Maine only sells fuel with ethanol :(

  24. Hal Stephan Sarasota, Fl

    Ethanol-Free Gas Stations http://www.historicvehicle.org/Commissions/Commissions/Legislative/Pure-Gas-Map My local station is Max's Mart on Clark Rd and only has ethanol free gas for unleaded, which they call it recreational fuel.

  25. Hal Stephan Sarasota, Fl

    Ethanol-Free Gas Stations http://www.historicvehicle.org/Commissions/Commissions/Legislative/Pure-Gas-Map My local station is Max's Mart on Clark Rd and only has ethanol free gas for unleaded, which they call it recreational fuel.

  26. Paintxpert Ct.

    Ct is OK with no emmissions for my 1969 Mercury Cougar Conv. Taxes are 17.00 per year.....thats OK too. Reg is 45 bucks per year paid Bi-anually. Thats OK . I run Shell high test. Car seems to like it. Let me tell you what they hit me for my 2005 Mustang Gt .......this is a SEVEN year old car.....sitting down??? 391.00.........HORRIBLE!!!! But cars over 20 they are excellent. Lets hope that tax increase doesnt happen for antiques and calssics. "Paintxpert"

  27. Mike Prosper, TX

    The state of TX is good to classic car owners when it comes to registration fees, etc. However, the people here are not so kind to classic car owners. I have lived in four states, and the DFW area is the first place I've lived where people ride my bumper, wave their fists at me and give me the bird for "driving too slowly" (i.e., doing the speed limit), which I guess explains why I see so few old cars on the road here. It's actually unpleasant to drive my 1950 Chevrolet around town, so I stay as far out in the country as I can to avoid the pinheads (the car has a 1960 261 engine and 3.55:1 rear gears, so it is more than capable of driving down the road at 65 or 70 MPH). It's a shame; you'd think people would enjoy seeing more of these cars on the road - go figure.

  28. Mike Prosper, TX

    The state of TX is good to classic car owners when it comes to registration fees, etc. However, the people here are not so kind to classic car owners. I have lived in four states, and the DFW area is the first place I've lived where people ride my bumper, wave their fists at me and give me the bird for "driving too slowly" (i.e., doing the speed limit), which I guess explains why I see so few old cars on the road here. It's actually unpleasant to drive my 1950 Chevrolet around town, so I stay as far out in the country as I can to avoid the pinheads (the car has a 1960 261 engine and 3.55:1 rear gears, so it is more than capable of driving down the road at 65 or 70 MPH). It's a shame; you'd think people would enjoy seeing more of these cars on the road - go figure.

  29. Mike Prosper, TX

    The state of TX is good to classic car owners when it comes to registration fees, etc. However, the people here are not so kind to classic car owners. I have lived in four states, and the DFW area is the first place I've lived where people ride my bumper, wave their fists at me and give me the bird for "driving too slowly" (i.e., doing the speed limit), which I guess explains why I see so few old cars on the road here. It's actually unpleasant to drive my 1950 Chevrolet around town, so I stay as far out in the country as I can to avoid the pinheads (the car has a 1960 261 engine and 3.55:1 rear gears, so it is more than capable of driving down the road at 65 or 70 MPH). It's a shame; you'd think people would enjoy seeing more of these cars on the road - go figure.

  30. Mike Prosper, TX

    The state of TX is good to classic car owners when it comes to registration fees, etc. However, the people here are not so kind to classic car owners. I have lived in four states, and the DFW area is the first place I've lived where people ride my bumper, wave their fists at me and give me the bird for "driving too slowly" (i.e., doing the speed limit), which I guess explains why I see so few old cars on the road here. It's actually unpleasant to drive my 1950 Chevrolet around town, so I stay as far out in the country as I can to avoid the pinheads (the car has a 1960 261 engine and 3.55:1 rear gears, so it is more than capable of driving down the road at 65 or 70 MPH). It's a shame; you'd think people would enjoy seeing more of these cars on the road - go figure.

  31. Mike Prosper, TX

    The state of TX is good to classic car owners when it comes to registration fees, etc. However, the people here are not so kind to classic car owners. I have lived in four states, and the DFW area is the first place I've lived where people ride my bumper, wave their fists at me and give me the bird for "driving too slowly" (i.e., doing the speed limit), which I guess explains why I see so few old cars on the road here. It's actually unpleasant to drive my 1950 Chevrolet around town, so I stay as far out in the country as I can to avoid the pinheads (the car has a 1960 261 engine and 3.55:1 rear gears, so it is more than capable of driving down the road at 65 or 70 MPH). It's a shame; you'd think people would enjoy seeing more of these cars on the road - go figure.

  32. Steve Brown Vashon Island, WA

    Washington, like its neighbor to the south is mostly a friendly state for collectibles. If the vehicle is not to be used for regular transportation and is 30 years and older, it can be licensed for a one-time fee of $40, and may, for another one-time $40 fee, carry a single, rear, year of manufacture license plate. At time of purchase, however, it will be subject to the state's sales tax (now just under 10%) on the purchase price - the state has no income tax, so is dependent on sales and property taxes for revenue..

  33. Steve Brown Vashon Island, WA

    Washington, like its neighbor to the south is mostly a friendly state for collectibles. If the vehicle is not to be used for regular transportation and is 30 years and older, it can be licensed for a one-time fee of $40, and may, for another one-time $40 fee, carry a single, rear, year of manufacture license plate. At time of purchase, however, it will be subject to the state's sales tax (now just under 10%) on the purchase price - the state has no income tax, so is dependent on sales and property taxes for revenue..

  34. Mike Roth Rutherford

    I have to give Kudos to the state of New Jersey, they maybe killing me with property taxes, but for Classic Cars they’re doing the right thing. The state charges a one-time registration fee ($44.50 standard and $64.00 personalized) with an automatic registration renewal every 3 years free of charge. All registered Classic Cars are inspection exempt, safety and emissions. New Jersey does require a front and rear plate, but I haven’t mounted the front plates and somehow managed to avoid any issues with both cars. I would have to say that the state of New Jersey is quite Classic Car friendly. I just wished we had friendlier winters.

  35. Mike Roth Rutherford

    I have to give Kudos to the state of New Jersey, they maybe killing me with property taxes, but for Classic Cars they’re doing the right thing. The state charges a one-time registration fee ($44.50 standard and $64.00 personalized) with an automatic registration renewal every 3 years free of charge. All registered Classic Cars are inspection exempt, safety and emissions. New Jersey does require a front and rear plate, but I haven’t mounted the front plates and somehow managed to avoid any issues with both cars. I would have to say that the state of New Jersey is quite Classic Car friendly. I just wished we had friendlier winters.

  36. robert steinman southern illinois

    i have antique plates on my '69 Camaro. not expensive and no inspections required.

  37. robert steinman southern illinois

    I have antique plates on my '69 Camaro, not expensive and no inspections required.

  38. Sevval The only way I have seen this done is if each bank is local. You would go into her bank and pay the car off and receive a earlese form from her bank. Then go into your bank and pay the car off and get a earlese from your bank. Bring these papers into DMV and have them swapped. Call DMV first if this is doable to check if additional paperwork is required in your state. Not familiar with the process of changing the names on the loans as mentioned above, but that sounds like the way to go if you don't have cash on hand to pay the cars off, even if just temporary. Was this answer helpful?

    The only way I have seen this done is if each bank is local. You would go into her bank and pay the car off and receive a earlese form from her bank. Then go into your bank and pay the car off and get a earlese from your bank. Bring these papers into DMV and have them swapped. Call DMV first if this is doable to check if additional paperwork is required in your state. Not familiar with the process of changing the names on the loans as mentioned above, but that sounds like the way to go if you don't have cash on hand to pay the cars off, even if just temporary. Was this answer helpful?