Partnering for Military Vehicle Preservation



August 24, 2011

Dayton, Ohio, was the scene for the 36th Annual Military Vehicle Preservation Association convention and the Historic Vehicle Association was there. Find out what makes this annual convention one of the most unique car events anywhere and how the partnership between the HVA and the MVPA is growing. 
 
Do you think that if you’ve seen one car show you’ve seen them all? Then you definitely haven’t been to an event like the annual convention of the Military Vehicle Preservation Association.

For starters, when was the last time you’ve been to a show where there was a genuine Sherman tank? Or how about a live water demonstration showcasing a real amphibious LVT-4 watercraft of the sort that charged through German artillery to deliver troops on the beaches of Normandy? No ordinary car show, for sure.

“I’ve never been to a more organized show or seen a group of more knowledgeable vehicle enthusiasts,” says HVA’s Club Relations Manager, Matt Zerilli. One of HVA’s team members who helped man the HVA booth at the E.J. Nutter Center in Dayton August 3rd through the 6th, Zerilli also delivered two presentations over the weekend on social and political threats facing all historic vehicle enthusiasts.

“This was the first of a number of car shows the HVA plans to attend over the coming months,” says Zerilli. “Interest in historic military vehicles is really growing, and the MVPA is definitely the premier military vehicle group. We thought it was one of the best places to start speaking to people directly about the work the HVA is doing to help keep ‘Yesterday’s Vehicles on Tomorrow’s Roads.’”

According to Zerilli, the MVPA convention focused on judging events and unique seminars that were largely preservation and equipment-centric.

“Most of the people I met and talked to were experienced with military vehicle restoration, and many were ex-military mechanics who could take a vehicle completely apart, pack it up in a crate for shipping, and then put it back together again. In fact, one of my favorite demonstrations was seeing the reassembly of the Air Transportable WC-51.”

Military vehicle enthusiasts not only love to work on their vehicles but also drive them. As a group, this makes them a very visible segment of the historic vehicle community who very much understands the importance of the lobbying and legislative work the HVA is doing on behalf of the entire historic vehicle community.

“Earlier this year, the HVA became an official partner of the MVPA,” says Zerilli. “They pulled off a wonderful event and we’re already looking forward to next June, 2012, when their annual meet will be held in Huntsville, Alabama.”

 

Comments

  1. John McEntire Jackson , Mi.

    I am an Officer of the Great Lakes MVPA . We are one of the Michigan Affiliates of the International MVPA . We were established in 1995 and have 86 Michigan Members. I personaly have been a Antique Military Vehicle Owner who has had his Military Vehicles insured through Hagerty Ins. Co. for all of these years and have been very happy with their Insurance coverage since the begining. Thank You so much for covering our National Convention and including our National Event in your latest Internet isue. We just completed our 15th. Annual Great Lakes MVPA Military Vehicle Show / Swap Meet in Clare Mi.

  2. berlin seaborn chattanooga, tennessee

    went to the show what a great event. cant wait untill next year

  3. berlin seaborn chattanooga, tennessee

    went to the show what e great event. cant wait untill next year

  4. Moni Hi anonymous,I've not seen these slabs ylsemf, but I think I know what they are.Ridged paving stones are used at the start and end of cycle paths, and are supposed to be repeated at specific intervals. They're known as tactile paving and are supposed to show visually impaired (VI) pedestrians which paths are for bikes and which for pedestrians.You will also have seen these, with raised knobbles at pedestrian crossings, where they're for the same also for VI pedestrians.On paths which are split between pedestrians and cyclists, the ridges run across the path for the pedestrian side and along the line of the path for the cyclist side.We've told the council that we don't like these paving stones. Mainly because when they're wet they'll hook the side of a narrower bike tyre if you try to cross them at a slight angle, pulling the wheel in a different direction to intended, like being caught in a rut. My wife dislikes these when walking, and they wake up sleeping babies in pushchairs; in fact, she switches to the bike side when pushing pushchairs over the slabs, somewhat defeating the point of them (she checks for bikes first, obviously).A council officer told me that the use of these slabs is set out in national guidance, which specifies the depth and width and repeat interval, and that Darlington council policy is to follow the guidelines to the letter. However, the officer also told me that not all councils follow the guidleines quite so rigidly.The same rigid adherance to guidelines that don't always work in practice is the reason why we don't have any advanced stop lines in Darlington (no room for filter lanes leading to them) and why loads of money is spent on widening paths like the one through Beech Wod from Asda to Barmpton Lane, to meet the guidleines for a shared use path, even though pedestrians and cyclists have been sharing that path since the houses were built with no problems.

    Hi anonymous,I've not seen these slabs ylsemf, but I think I know what they are.Ridged paving stones are used at the start and end of cycle paths, and are supposed to be repeated at specific intervals. They're known as tactile paving and are supposed to show visually impaired (VI) pedestrians which paths are for bikes and which for pedestrians.You will also have seen these, with raised knobbles at pedestrian crossings, where they're for the same also for VI pedestrians.On paths which are split between pedestrians and cyclists, the ridges run across the path for the pedestrian side and along the line of the path for the cyclist side.We've told the council that we don't like these paving stones. Mainly because when they're wet they'll hook the side of a narrower bike tyre if you try to cross them at a slight angle, pulling the wheel in a different direction to intended, like being caught in a rut. My wife dislikes these when walking, and they wake up sleeping babies in pushchairs; in fact, she switches to the bike side when pushing pushchairs over the slabs, somewhat defeating the point of them (she checks for bikes first, obviously).A council officer told me that the use of these slabs is set out in national guidance, which specifies the depth and width and repeat interval, and that Darlington council policy is to follow the guidelines to the letter. However, the officer also told me that not all councils follow the guidleines quite so rigidly.The same rigid adherance to guidelines that don't always work in practice is the reason why we don't have any advanced stop lines in Darlington (no room for filter lanes leading to them) and why loads of money is spent on widening paths like the one through Beech Wod from Asda to Barmpton Lane, to meet the guidleines for a shared use path, even though pedestrians and cyclists have been sharing that path since the houses were built with no problems.