Amelia Island's Preservation Trophy Winner

by Mark Gessler

April 26, 2011

Rare Duesenberg Wins FIVA/HVA Preservation Trophy at Amelia Island Concours.

The FIVA/HVA Preservation Trophy is given to those ultra-rare, historic vehicles that retain much, if not all, of their original mechanical components, body, interior and finishes.  At the Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance last month, this elite-status recognition went to Gary Bahre for his 1940 Duesenberg SJ Town Car Cabriolet by Rollson.

This long-wheelbase, supercharged chassis was assembled by the Duesenberg factory in late 1937, but was not completed by Rollson until April 1940 due to a series of intriguing events.  First owner, Rudolph Bauer, was a famous German artist and contracted Rollson—an offshoot of the famous Rollston Company coachbuilders—to create this spectacular coachwork based on design drawings he provided.  Bauer was imprisoned by the Nazi regime and later rescued by art collector and connoisseur Solomon Guggenheim, who brought him to the United States where the artist spent the rest of his life.

Driven less than 11,000 miles, Bauer’s special Duesenburg—known today as the “Bauer Car”—is now over 70 years old and still as immaculate and stunning as the day it was finished.

Under its original, black silk convertible top, the coachwork retains all its original paint and bright work and is near flawless.  The interior features its original violet carpet and striking leather upholstery, which was re-dyed in recent years.  Under the hood, the engine and drive train are in the same condition as delivered.  The car also still rides on its rare and original Vogue double whitewall tires.

FIVA President and Chairman, Horst Brüning, was on hand to present the FIVA/HVA Preservation Trophy.  Other Preservation Trophy judges included the HVA’s Mark Gessler and renowned collector Fred Simeone.

Comments

  1. Yudi Hey, that's kind of funny Richard. I strated reading this and was thinking I might have something to say.Actually, my son as the current soldier and Iraqi vet would be better to comment. But my comment comes more as a concerned parent back here during the first year or so of the war.For most of that time, at least where Jeremy was at heart of the Sunni triangle there was little reliable telecommunications for non-mission purposes. There was no internet almost until they came home after 11 mos, and the phones were crappy satellite phones.So, on one hand, my concern is the in theater servicemember's early experiences did not get recorded/encoded into the sorts of newer media that Richard is discussing here and thus don't even exist to be lost. On the other hand, maybe some of it is out there in old-fashioned media, such as paper journals. In fact, disposal cameras were one of the hot items to be sent in the early days, so I'm guessing that a large percentage of many of the early photos from in theater won't be digital either. Of course, things would vary dramatically for those stationed in one of the Presidential Palaces in Baghdad and a soldier in an infantry unit out in the desert. Sailors would possibly have tightened restrictions on the amount of non-mission telecommunications, but they'd probably have their normal capabilities.What soldiers needed changed dramatically over the course of the first 11 months we were there as camps got built, reinforced, prettified, etc. So digital resources would be going from practically nil to prevalent in many areas, but at highly different rates.I do think that someone should be trying to preserve some of this material. In all formats. All viewpoints.I found your lead-in about stationary supplies interesting as I spent a fair amount of time talking about the availability of paper during the Civil War and its effect on reading and publishing in my paper for Boyd's history class.

    Hey, that's kind of funny Richard. I strated reading this and was thinking I might have something to say.Actually, my son as the current soldier and Iraqi vet would be better to comment. But my comment comes more as a concerned parent back here during the first year or so of the war.For most of that time, at least where Jeremy was at heart of the Sunni triangle there was little reliable telecommunications for non-mission purposes. There was no internet almost until they came home after 11 mos, and the phones were crappy satellite phones.So, on one hand, my concern is the in theater servicemember's early experiences did not get recorded/encoded into the sorts of newer media that Richard is discussing here and thus don't even exist to be lost. On the other hand, maybe some of it is out there in old-fashioned media, such as paper journals. In fact, disposal cameras were one of the hot items to be sent in the early days, so I'm guessing that a large percentage of many of the early photos from in theater won't be digital either. Of course, things would vary dramatically for those stationed in one of the Presidential Palaces in Baghdad and a soldier in an infantry unit out in the desert. Sailors would possibly have tightened restrictions on the amount of non-mission telecommunications, but they'd probably have their normal capabilities.What soldiers needed changed dramatically over the course of the first 11 months we were there as camps got built, reinforced, prettified, etc. So digital resources would be going from practically nil to prevalent in many areas, but at highly different rates.I do think that someone should be trying to preserve some of this material. In all formats. All viewpoints.I found your lead-in about stationary supplies interesting as I spent a fair amount of time talking about the availability of paper during the Civil War and its effect on reading and publishing in my paper for Boyd's history class.