Siphoning Your Wallet?



March 30, 2011

Gas prices are climbing. But what is the consumer actually paying for at the pump when they buy a gallon of gas? Here’s a look at the basic breakdown of costs and links to useful resources about what goes into gas prices, where we get our fuel and—most importantly for the beginning of the “cruise” season—an interactive map of where you can get fuel without ethanol.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, roughly 400 million gallons of gas are sold every day in America and very few consumers know anything about where all that money actually goes. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration who last did a fuel cost analysis in 2010, there are four main factors that go into determining the cost of a gallon of gas.

The illustration on the left offers a basic explanation at a glance. Although prices have risen substantially since 2009, the percentage breakdown of what a consumer pays—per gallon—in taxes, refining, marketing and distribution costs remains relatively unchanged. Click here to find a detailed discussion of what you’re actually paying at the pump—as well as regional price differences and why they exist.

Where Does Our Oil Really Come From?

Saudi Arabia? Libya? Iraq? You might be surprised to learn that 51 percent of U.S. oil comes from the Western hemisphere (North, South and Central America). For more information, click here.

HVA’s Pure Gas Map

Cruise season is almost upon us. If you want to know where you can you find ethanol-free fuel in your state, then click here to check out the HVA’s new and interactive “Pure Gas Map.” HVA would like to say a special thanks to www.pure-gas.org and car-guys from around the country for much of the data you’ll find here.

Comments

  1. Cordelia eFJbBd Cool! That's a clever way of looking at it!

    eFJbBd Cool! That's a clever way of looking at it!

  2. Mahaley

    Heckuva good job. I sure appreciate it.

  3. Wayne that hwveoer, I happen to think that current reactor technology is more than sufficient for the near to medium term, and that there should be no delay building out with these designs while a clearer picture develops on which Gen IV ideas will be best to go forward on.

    that hwveoer, I happen to think that current reactor technology is more than sufficient for the near to medium term, and that there should be no delay building out with these designs while a clearer picture develops on which Gen IV ideas will be best to go forward on.