Comparative Evaulation of Prevention of Gasohol Phase Separation by Fuel Additives

by: Benjamin Kellogg

October 31, 2011

Do ethanol fuel additives really deliver what they promise and help save your engine from the ravages of E10? In this article, some popular fuel additives are put to the test.
 
Did you know that certain fuel additives can increase the stability of fuels containing ethanol?  Author and chemist Benjamin Kellogg discusses several readily available additives and how they can make modern fuels less harmful to your historic vehicles.  This article, which first appeared in the Fall 2011 issue of Army Motors, presents the results of an objective experiment designed to prove or refute the benefits of “fuel stabilizers.”  --The Editors
 
 
Introduction:

To design a simple, yet reproducible experiment to test the “storage enhancing” properties of fuel stabilizers, I decided to test the ability of these additives to alter phase separation points. Two additives were compared by a simple titration experiment.

Background:

E10 gasohol is an inherently hygroscopic (absorbing and retaining water) solution due to the chemical nature of the ethanol (ethyl alcohol) added to the petroleum gasoline. The hygroscopic character of the ethanol means that gasohol will contain water. The actual amount of water that can be held in solution in E10 varies directly with temperature. At 20° C, E10 can contain as much as 0.5 ml of water per 100 ml of E10. At -10° C, E10 can only hold 0.3 ml of water per 100 ml of E10.

Once the water content exceeds these limits, the phenomenon of “phase separation” will occur. Gasohol phase separation happens when the ethanol and water components separate from the petroleum gasoline; i.e., the “phases” of the E10 gasohol solution “separate.”

During phase separation, the more dense ethanol and water components settle to the bottom of the container (i.e., the fuel tank), while the less dense gasoline components rise to the top. The process is essentially irreversible. If phase separation happens in a fuel tank, corrosion can occur in the lower aspects of the tank exposed to the ethanol and water component. Fuel stabilizers purportedly allow a greater amount of water to remain in solution in the gasohol before phase separation occurs. This claim could be tested.

Methods:

Two Eastwood “Fuel Guard” products were obtained for these tests: Fuel Guard Protection formula to be used for every fill-up and Fuel Stabilizer formula for fuel stored up to 12 months. These fuel additives were mixed separately and in combination into 50 ml of E10 gasohol according to manufacturer’s instructions. The amounts of each that were added to 50 ml of E10 are given in the following table:
CONTROL No additive
Fuel Protection Formula 0.15625 ml
Fuel Stabilization Formula 0.15625 ml
Fuel Protection Formula
and
Fuel Stabilization Formula
0.15625 ml and
0.15625 ml
Additive total = 0.3125

These solutions were placed in flasks and cooled to 10° C in an ice bath. The solution in each flask was stirred with a magnetic stirrer while distilled water was titrated in. The end point of each titration was visually determined upon noting the occurrence of phase separation.
 
 
Results:

E10 with no additives underwent phase separation with the addition of 0.30 ml water. In contrast, addition of either the Fuel Protection or Fuel Stabilization formulas delayed phase separation until the addition of 0.50 and 0.49 ml of water, respectively. Finally, the addition of both the Fuel Protection and Fuel Stabilization formulas to 50 ml E10 delayed phase separation until 0.69 ml water was added.

Discussion:

When used separately, either the Eastwood Fuel Protection Formula or Fuel Stabilization Formula increases the amount of water that can be retained in solution by E10 gasohol by 66% before phase separation occurs. Furthermore, the combination of both additives in E10 increases resistance to phase separation by 133 percent; a significantly better result than when either product was used alone.

These results demonstrate that the risk of phase separation is reduced when these products are used in E10 gasohol. The reason for the increased effectiveness of the combination of the two formulas is unclear. Product information available to the consumer states that both additives contain exactly the same chemical ingredients: napthenic oil, hydroethylated aminoethylamide, and petroleum naptha. The proportions of these ingredients in the different products are not given (nor were they provided to me despite a direct request to Eastwood). It is possible that the advantage derived from combining the Fuel Protection and Fuel Stabilization formulas represented a mere doubling of the ingredients rather than some other enhancement derived from combining the two products.

Conclusions:

Eastwood Ethanol Fuel Protection and Fuel Stabilization formulas significantly increase E10 gasohol resistance to phase separation and decrease the probability that phase separation will occur in the fuel tank of stored vehicles.

Epilogue:

Given the results of the foregoing experiment, I will incorporate the fuel additives into the gasohol that goes into my HMVs. The additive’s cost will be insignificant compared to the cost of repairs that could result from the use of E10. In addition, tanks of fuel last a long time in my historic military vehicles and thus increases the risk of gasohol related problems, so I have decided to keep a minimal amount of fuel in their tanks so that the fuel is replenished frequently with new fuel and the now-proven-effective anti-alcohol additives. The fuel additives worked in the lab, so they should work in the tank.
Results:

E10 with no additives underwent phase separation with the addition of 0.30 ml water. In contrast, addition of either the Fuel Protection or Fuel Stabilization formulas delayed phase separation until the addition of 0.50 and 0.49 ml of water, respectively. Finally, the addition of both the Fuel Protection and Fuel Stabilization formulas to 50 ml E10 delayed phase separation until 0.69 ml water was added.

Comments

  1. Steve Beurkens Grand Rapids, Michigan

    Great news. I have been using Stabil in my 1973 Triumph TR6 for the past 15 winters. The car is stored from mid-October until the snow/salt is gone...usually the first week of April. I have NEVER had a starting problem in the spring...1 turn of the key and away we go! I have great faith in fuel stabilizers, so it's nice to know that faith is scientifically founded!

  2. Paul Aruda Cedar Hill TX.

    I use a product called Sea Foam and it has worked very will in my cars. I put it in every 3-4000 miles. Ethanol is not a good product for any of our cars. It may help the farmer but not our cars. Paul Aruda

  3. landis aden mesa, az

    How about high temps like here in AZ? any studies done on that? Also, folks have claimed that marvel mystery oil can do much the same any research on that thx

  4. Brian R Adams Reno, NV

    It seems likely the two products are largely the same, and all you did was double up the dosage. Presumably this will do no harm. Why didn't you run the same experiment using only a double-dose of either one of the products to prove they are equivalent? Why couldn't someone set up a sort of settling still, where on could add water to E10 until phase separation occurs, then drain the ethanol/water out the bottom, leaving 99+% gasoline behind?

  5. David Billus Watertown, CT

    I read an E10 article in your last newsletter. This article was taken from the advise of a seasoned mechanic who only works on classic vehicles and has been doing so since 1957. He recommmended a soy based additive from a company named Schaeffer. Their product which is only sold by the case which I ordered cost me over $180.00 with shipping. Now this article recommends An Eastwood product. Are either or both of these underwritten? Just when I thought I was all set, you now a pushing this additive. Are either the Schaeffer or the Eastwood ones acceptable or have you changed your tune in favor of Eastwood's products. I'm dissapointed and baffled. Please respond.

  6. Alex Seattle, WA

    Better than additives, why not get ethanol free gasoline? pure-gas.org is a website that list stations selling ethanol free gas

  7. Bill Gifford, Washington

    Your experiment appears to support the use of both additives in the Manufacturers recommended amounts. However, laboritory conditions are not available when filling up at the local distillary. What do your results show if the amounts are exceeded? If a little does a little good does a lot do a lot better? What are your thoughts?

  8. Rocky Faulconer Yakima, WA 98902

    There are so many fuel stabilization additives out on the market from sta-bil Eastwood, and many more. Eastwood is a mail order thing for us and freight is costly - and just remembering to order it is hard. Does Benjamin have a suggestion for a fuel stabilizer that is more common and easyer to get at the local part store? like sta-bil Rocky

  9. Todd VA

    Good article!

  10. Ron Maurer Iowa

    I run an auto repair shop and occasionally I see older cars that have been stored for years and won’t run. I will end up with the carburetor apart & cleaning & the fuel tank off and cleaning. I have found all the ones I have seen with bad problems had Sta-Bil fuel preservative and E-10 fuel (90% of the fuel sold in Iowa) and have been stored for several years. The tanks look like they have a growth in them. I have seen Microbial growth in Diesel fuel tanks and it may be somewhat similar but different. I had to throw some tanks away. I had a Dodge with a plastic fuel tank that the brass float on the gas gauge sender was ate away. Draw your own conclusions. I have been storing my Grand Prix for the winter for 25 years and put it away with very little fuel and NO additive and have never had a problem. When I drive it in the summer I add only enough fuel that I think I will use for the day in order to keep the fuel fresh. Ron Maurer ASE Master Tech

  11. bluen0te Ct.

    I'm wondering if the writer has any connection to Eastwood. I'd feel a lot stronger about these results if a few more products such as Startron and Staybil had been mentioned in the test.

  12. Roger Sitterly Des Moines, Iowa

    It would have been nice if he'd tested the combination of "fuel protection" and "fuel stabilization" formulas against 10% gasohol with .3125 ml of "fuel protection" in it and against 10% gasohol with .3125 ml of "fuel stabilization" in it. If he found that doubling the quantity of just one product in the gasohol delayed phase separation until 0.69 ml of water content, that would be useful knowledge for those of us concerned about the deleterious effects of using E10 fuel in our older vehicles. Has anyone done any similar tests with other fuel stabilization products on the market (ie, Stabil, which I use in my lawn mower over the winter and my snow blower during the summer)?

  13. bluen0te Ct.

    I'm wondering if the writer has any connection to Eastwood. I'd feel a lot stronger about these results if a few more products such as Startron and Staybil had been mentioned in the test.

  14. J.L. Hamilton TEXAS

    Wish the test had used some of the more readily available products like Sta-Bil or Phazer. Eastwood products have to be ordered from the catalog or internet to get them in most of the country.

  15. D Yaros United States

    For more info on the effects of E10 in collector cars, see the Nov 2011 issue of Car Collector Chronicles, found online at http://www.scribd.com/people/view/7936333-dave

  16. Brian tremblay British Columbia, Canada

    I've seen the effects of ehanol gasolines on related fuel parts ie; rubber lines, aluminium components but what about aluminium gas tanks that alot of car builders are getting for their hobby these days?

  17. JR. Greenwich NY.

    How about testing "Sta-Bil" fuel additive? It is much more readily available to the consumer as they can pick it up at any auto parts and hardware stores. I also have a big jug on my shelf, have had no bad effects in the past, and was wondering if it was due to this product. Thanks, JR.

  18. Bob Foster Bishop, GA

    All good information. There should have been a cost per tank or cost per gallon for the use of the additives included in the report. I guess I could go to Eastwood and do the cost analysis myself.

  19. Rudy Pyrek Warren, Michigan

    While I find this report most helpful, I can't stop thinking that a better solution to would be to offer classic vehicle owners "real" 100% gasoline. I know that in every state there are several stations that still have access to this product. Ref. web-site (pure-gas.org). Not only would it eliminate this problem, it would also increase mileage by nearly 50%. I know this is true through my own records on my 2004 Buick Le Sabre with a 3800 v-6 engine (Auto-trans.) My milage has dropped from: 31mpg hwy. to 25mpg. And 25mpg city to 18mpg. Who's fooling who! Ethenol isn't making less dependant on foreign oil, it's just made us increase our use. In the long run, foreign oil and subsidized corn growing farmers get rich and we ,the consumers take a bath again! I am sure that new technologies would increase milage in gasoline engines to a point where foreign oil dependency would not be an issue. Thank you for letting me vent.

  20. C J Davis Central Michigan

    After reading this article I would surmise that a good way to help save your fuel tank would be to litterally run your vehicle out of fuel, prior to putting it away for any extended period of time. [winter in the northern areas].

  21. John Engfehr Wyandotte

    I'm a retired engineer who tested fuels and oils for many years. I could write a book on the adverse effects of ethanol on engines. The real problem is during combustion where it forms acid in the combustion chamber and etches the bore and rings. It degrades oil as it gets wiped into the crankcase and can lead to extreme wear throughout the engine. It was only approved by automakers because it gave them fuel economy "credits" (CAFE credits) with the EPA that allowed them to sell more high end vehicles (profit). It is not safe to use in any engine in amounts over 15%. Oil change intervals must be shortened from 5000 miles to 3000 or less with ethanol use. There is big money pushing to hide the facts and ignore the long term implications.

  22. David Allison St Simons Island

    There is a simpler way for those of us near marinas and ports.Marine gas is offered at the marinas and in the last year or two several local gas stations have installed "Marine pumps" I have used this gas in my historic vehicles and can sleep soundly with no worries of H2o sneaking into my tanks as this fuel is alchohol free. Check with the major fuel distributors in your area to find this friendlier fuel in your area.

  23. S Mcnutt indiana

    Nice to see a correctly done scientific evaluation.

  24. Arlene Walker Pasadena, Maryland

    I have a 1982 Corvette which I rarely drive. I usually keep a full tank of gas in it and occasionally use a fuel additive, so if I understand the article correctly should I only leave a small amount of gas in the tank over the winter? I was always told to fill the tank so condensation does not form. Any advice?

  25. Eric White Lapeer, MI

    Very informative test. My question to Mr. Kellogg is, if the two additives are chemically identical, why didn't he continue with his testing to determine if doubling the dose of each additive on its own resulted in the same increase of water retention as the combined effect revealed? Also, if doubling the dose resulted in increased retention of water in E10, would increasing the dosage continue to increase the effect? At what point would increased dosage become ineffective?

  26. Ernie Atl. Ga

    An increase in the water content of fuel also decreases the effective octane in the fuel, so, care should be taken on higher compression engines that are close to the verge of octane requirements.

  27. Arlene Walker Pasadena Maryland

    I have 1982 Corvette and have always been told to store it with a full tank to avaid condensation. Is there no truth to that?

  28. Arlene Walker Pasadena Maryland

    I have 1982 Corvette and have always been told to store it with a full tank to avaid condensation. Is there no truth to that?

  29. Joe Richmond, VA

    Arlene, My wife's two classics will keep their tanks full this winter. I have followed that with our first older vehicle, a '68 Chevy C-10, and have been burning ethanol blends since we got it in 2003. I do start and run the vehicle all winter in in Virginia, and I top the tank off regularly, always with premium to mitigate the effects of octane drop. That all said, I am having horrible problems in Stihl chainsaws related to E-10 fuel. The tolerances may be nearly as fine in your 'Vette, so be careful. For the power equipment, I may run the saws with E10, but when I'm done I run the saw until it dies, then put in a bit of non-E10 for storage, after running the saw for 30 seconds or so. Mini Cooper dealers are now recommending that we use only top-tier fuels (Shell, BP, or Exxon, they claim) and avoid off-brand stations. Minis are developing problems related to E10. What a shame. I always liked the idea of ethanol, since I don't think domestic drilling for conventional oil is going to do much more than divide and disappoint us. Good luck with you 'Vette!

  30. Joe Richmond, VA

    Arlene, My wife's two classics will keep their tanks full this winter. I have followed that with our first older vehicle, a '68 Chevy C-10, and have been burning ethanol blends since we got it in 2003. I do start and run the vehicle all winter in in Virginia, and I top the tank off regularly, always with premium to mitigate the effects of octane drop. That all said, I am having horrible problems in Stihl chainsaws related to E-10 fuel. The tolerances may be nearly as fine in your 'Vette, so be careful. For the power equipment, I may run the saws with E10, but when I'm done I run the saw until it dies, then put in a bit of non-E10 for storage, after running the saw for 30 seconds or so. Mini Cooper dealers are now recommending that we use only top-tier fuels (Shell, BP, or Exxon, they claim) and avoid off-brand stations. Minis are developing problems related to E10. What a shame. I always liked the idea of ethanol, since I don't think domestic drilling for conventional oil is going to do much more than divide and disappoint us. Good luck with you 'Vette!

  31. Gary Portland Or.

    I started using STA-BIL some time ago in by Z and in my inboard boat. I have never had any trouble . Prior to its use I had a fuel pump failure and rubber fuel hose split. Both were near new parts. I contacted Sta-Bil asking the differences between the Marine use formula. And the regular storage formula. The Marine formula is double strength.

  32. Ronnie Davis Suwnaee,Ga

    Startron is the best Ethanol treatment. I use it in all my golf carts,movers,cars etc. http://mystarbrite.com/public/pdf/LIT010V2.1-101.pdf

  33. Michael Rubin Napa, CA

    Author Michael Pollan's well-regarded book "The Omnivore's Dilemma" does a terrific job explaining the politics behind ethanol in our gasoline. It began with Nixon's Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz turning farm price supports into corn subsidies, leading to constant overproduction and the need to find added uses for corn. We pay for it multiple times -- subsidies, required use in our fuel, plus restrictive tarrifs on ethanol from other countries, and the harm it does to our vehicles, classic and contemporary.

  34. Dave Michigan

    Before storing I use Premium fuel . Most stations in Michigan sell Premium WITHOUT ethanol there are some that do but not many . I add one can of Sea foam to this . Have had no issues with snowmobiles and cars . My generators I shut the fuel off and run the carb dry before storing . I try not to store fuel for long durations (2 yrs) in the tank if at all possible . Most e-10 fuels start to degrade after 6 months unless stored in a plastic air tight jug. Even then it does not store for a long time Just my 2 bits worth

  35. Dave Michigan

    Before storing I use Premium fuel . Most stations in Michigan sell Premium WITHOUT ethanol there are some that do but not many . I add one can of Sea foam to this . Have had no issues with snowmobiles and cars . My generators I shut the fuel off and run the carb dry before storing . I try not to store fuel for long durations (2 yrs) in the tank if at all possible . Most e-10 fuels start to degrade after 6 months unless stored in a plastic air tight jug. Even then it does not store for a long time Just my 2 bits worth

  36. joncrane Rochester Mich

    1. What is the baseline dehydration (life) for the gas we used 5 years ago? 2, What is the impact of other fuel stabilizers? Seafoam, Stable, Stable Marine.etc Thank you

  37. Joe Maryland

    I've been using StarTron in both my '68 Mustang and a '94 Dodge pickup. Also using it in my lawnmower and other small engine lawn tools. Even though the pickup "should" be able to handle ethanol, I find the Dodge is running much smoother since I started using StarTron. Also made an amazing difference in the Mustang. StarTron is available in several different "strengths" or concentrations to make it easier to use depending on the type of engine. For the small engines I buy the variety sold at Home Depot; for the vehicles I buy the one sold at WalMart (in their sporting goods dept at my local store).

  38. Joe Maryland

    I've been using StarTron in both my '68 Mustang and a '94 Dodge pickup. Also using it in my lawnmower and other small engine lawn tools. Even though the pickup "should" be able to handle ethanol, I find the Dodge is running much smoother since I started using StarTron. Also made an amazing difference in the Mustang. StarTron is available in several different "strengths" or concentrations to make it easier to use depending on the type of engine. For the small engines I buy the variety sold at Home Depot; for the vehicles I buy the one sold at WalMart (in their sporting goods dept at my local store).

  39. Bruce Wisconsin

    I am pleased to see that a large number of filling stations in Wisconsin are now offering no alcohol gasoline. I have one in my town that not only offers no alcohol premium, but no alcohol regular. It is more expensive, but the added fuel mileage makes up for that. I keep my MGB and MGTD filled all winter with strait gas and still do add a stabilizer (don't remember the brand but it is what we use for carburettor snowmobiles). I had to change a fuel gauge float in the TD last year so I got a look at the inside of the tank using a flexible camera used for looking in walls. Tank is in very good condition. I note that vehicles with carbs such as two stroke bikes and snowmobiles do not run well on E10. I know Briggs and Stratton is against E15, they know their carburetor mower and other small engines will not run on E15 and they don't want all the complaints . BTW. The E15 pump I saw in town had a big sign on it that said Only For Use in Cars Built after 2000

  40. Lou Pa

    Mercury Marine in conjunction with one of the Marine Industry trade magazines just held a webinar for all of their dealers. On hand were several experts from the marine industry, engine builders and fuel experts. The usage of an additive for ethanol fuel is a necessity and should be used at all fill ups. Initially when ethanol was introduced the general consensus was to keep as little fuel in your tank as possible thereby adding new fuel to freshen up the old fuel. THIS HAS BEEN PROVEN FALSE. They used the analogy of. If you have a half gallon of sour milk do you add another half gallon to it to make it fresh? I don't. Alcohol does not draw moisture from the air. It absorbs what moisture enters the fuel, usually from condensation. Therefore, keeping your tank completely full, topped off, keeps the tank from forming condensation because there is no where for it to form. Additionally, once fuel has gone into phase separation nothing can be done to bring it back. Adding fresh fuel does not work.

  41. Lou Pa

    Mercury Marine in conjunction with one of the Marine Industry trade magazines just held a webinar for all of their dealers. On hand were several experts from the marine industry, engine builders and fuel experts. The usage of an additive for ethanol fuel is a necessity and should be used at all fill ups. Initially when ethanol was introduced the general consensus was to keep as little fuel in your tank as possible thereby adding new fuel to freshen up the old fuel. THIS HAS BEEN PROVEN FALSE. They used the analogy of. If you have a half gallon of sour milk do you add another half gallon to it to make it fresh? I don't. Alcohol does not draw moisture from the air. It absorbs what moisture enters the fuel, usually from condensation. Therefore, keeping your tank completely full, topped off, keeps the tank from forming condensation because there is no where for it to form. Additionally, once fuel has gone into phase separation nothing can be done to bring it back. Adding fresh fuel does not work.

  42. Lou Pa

    Mercury Marine in conjunction with one of the Marine Industry trade magazines just held a webinar for all of their dealers. On hand were several experts from the marine industry, engine builders and fuel experts. The usage of an additive for ethanol fuel is a necessity and should be used at all fill ups. Initially when ethanol was introduced the general consensus was to keep as little fuel in your tank as possible thereby adding new fuel to freshen up the old fuel. THIS HAS BEEN PROVEN FALSE. They used the analogy of. If you have a half gallon of sour milk do you add another half gallon to it to make it fresh? I don't. Alcohol does not draw moisture from the air. It absorbs what moisture enters the fuel, usually from condensation. Therefore, keeping your tank completely full, topped off, keeps the tank from forming condensation because there is no where for it to form. Additionally, once fuel has gone into phase separation nothing can be done to bring it back. Adding fresh fuel does not work.

  43. reed martin delray beach, florida

    A much appreciated and informative article! I do have to side, however, with the folks who suggest finding a place that sells a non-ethanol gasoline. This past summer I put a "new" (used) motor in my 1970 Mini. Said motor came from an 80's era Mini Metro (sadly, these cars would literally rust while on the showroom floor meaning that often the car bodies were done before the motors were). One can surmise that the last time the motor was fired up, it was with ethanol free gasoline. After I got the car back, I filled the tank with my usual premium, it ran well, and then I went on vacation....... 5 weeks later the car wouldn't start. A trip to my local mechanic and $300 later my fuel system was cleaned and with it a tank of ethanol free gasoline. As mentioned before, the car ran well with the junk gas..... now it runs GREAT. It starts quickly, has noticeably more power, idles smoother, and the list goes on. Take care of your Classic!! DON'T run gasoline w/ ethanol in your car. It is CRAP!!

  44. reed martin delray beach, florida

    A much appreciated and informative article! I do have to side, however, with the folks who suggest finding a place that sells a non-ethanol gasoline. This past summer I put a "new" (used) motor in my 1970 Mini. Said motor came from an 80's era Mini Metro (sadly, these cars would literally rust while on the showroom floor meaning that often the car bodies were done before the motors were). One can surmise that the last time the motor was fired up, it was with ethanol free gasoline. After I got the car back, I filled the tank with my usual premium, it ran well, and then I went on vacation....... 5 weeks later the car wouldn't start. A trip to my local mechanic and $300 later my fuel system was cleaned and with it a tank of ethanol free gasoline. As mentioned before, the car ran well with the junk gas..... now it runs GREAT. It starts quickly, has noticeably more power, idles smoother, and the list goes on. Take care of your Classic!! DON'T run gasoline w/ ethanol in your car. It is CRAP!!

  45. John B Bradford Ma

    There is a shop near mine that only works on smaller engines, dirt bikes, ATV, snowmobiles, etc. Almost 75% of his work is cleaning out fuel systems, from vehicles that have sat around and not been taken care of. Some of the "stuff" that has grown inside the carbs and fuel tanks is something out of a biological experiment. Green sticky, goo. Spray carb cleaners barely touch the stuff, he has to soak the parts in paint thinner or commercial carb cleaner to get them clean. We have found that using "Race Fuel" from a good source has been beneficial to long storage. It does not take much , just enough to flush thru the tank and lines and fill the carb. Draw back is the cost, about $8 per gallon. Thanks.

  46. Gary M Southeast Florida

    I looked at pure-gas.org...problem is that what is listed avail in this area is marine gas with only 90 octane. My cars are high compression and require at least 93. At present I add stabil and stabil ethanol treatments both, and octane booster...plus one needs lead substitute also (all avail at walmart). It's like alchemy. Pain in the a-- .

  47. Scott Vorrath Michigan

    I buy Marine Gas Ethanol Free 90 octane cost $3.95 gallon in MI. And then add 5 gallons of 104 leaded racing gas to every tank full. Racing gas is supposed to be used for off road only ,but that is what was used in my mustang in the 60s so screw um!

  48. Paul Cannefax Palm Bay,Fl.

    OMG Ethanol has got to be the worst for our vintage cars. I have located Glover Oil here in Melbourne Fl. who sells fresh 93 octane non-ethanol gas. What a difference it makes. Performance and fuel economy is amazing. My 67 Karmann Ghia with it's performance engine runs like a champ, and the rubber inside the Dellorto Carbs wont get eaten away. My 98 Subaru is liking it as well. Best part on the Subie is that there fuel has increased mileage per gallon 3.5 MPG. I'm sold it may cost a little more but in the long run it is well worth it.

  49. Iko Paoli PA

    the only antiques I have are my 1941 Harley Flatty WL and my 1942 Harley WLA flatty. Ur articles primarily deal with cars not antique motorcycles. Does anyone recommend what to do about this problem plus the unlead petroldue to the fact that my harley engines are the originals still running and designed with leaded fuel available. Unfortunately PA wants to up the ethonal content to 20%. I use a combo of 75% Premium petrol mixed with 25% 100LL avgas [recommended to me by another harley antique owner]. I do have backfire problems sometimes and starting [lots of kicking]. Any solutions from antique motorcycle owners appreciated. Thanks!

  50. Kenneth amos Bergenfield, N.J.

    I have found that staybil is no way as good as it used to be,, maybe cause of the Ethanol in the gas now.. I work on lawn equipment and now so many more customers are bringing there tractors/ mowers ect in cause they won't start after the winter.... I tell them for 2 strokes drain gas and run till it stops,, then spray a little wd-40 in the tank and your fine,, gas engines drain tank run till stop and empty fuel bowl then spray wd-40 in bowl and tank.. if you can't remove bowl ,, spray a good amount of wd-40 in tank, try to restart and run till stop. forget the staybil completely.. kenny

  51. Iko Paoli PA

    the only antiques I have are my 1941 Harley Flatty WL and my 1942 Harley WLA flatty. Ur articles primarily deal with cars not antique motorcycles. Does anyone recommend what to do about this problem plus the unlead petroldue to the fact that my harley engines are the originals still running and designed with leaded fuel available. Unfortunately PA wants to up the ethonal content to 20%. I use a combo of 75% Premium petrol mixed with 25% 100LL avgas [recommended to me by another harley antique owner]. I do have backfire problems sometimes and starting [lots of kicking]. Any solutions from antique motorcycle owners appreciated. Thanks!

  52. Trish Texas

    My family and I use a product called XFT in our cars to prevent damage from ethanol. If you are interested, you can read more about it at this site: www.morecashlessgas.mysyntek.com

  53. Malinda No question this is the place to get this info, thakns y'all.

    No question this is the place to get this info, thakns y'all.

  54. IbudmargaPristyanandi If we were to harvest sea pltans, not just algae, from areas of the oceans that are called dead zones, areas that produce so much vegetation that the decomposing vegetation cause death of all animal life, we would have hundreds of times more biofuels than all we currently manufacture,Blue-green algae have a special value in that they manufacture their own nitrate fertilizer, and enough to fertilize large volumes of other pltans. We need to harvest the algae along with the other plant matter.These masses of algae are a problem because they are not being harvested in appropriate volumes. We seem to have lost most or all of our baleen whales that at one time ate so much of it.

    If we were to harvest sea pltans, not just algae, from areas of the oceans that are called dead zones, areas that produce so much vegetation that the decomposing vegetation cause death of all animal life, we would have hundreds of times more biofuels than all we currently manufacture,Blue-green algae have a special value in that they manufacture their own nitrate fertilizer, and enough to fertilize large volumes of other pltans. We need to harvest the algae along with the other plant matter.These masses of algae are a problem because they are not being harvested in appropriate volumes. We seem to have lost most or all of our baleen whales that at one time ate so much of it.

  55. Corey Buford, GA

    Sta-bil - not bad; Phazzer - garbage; Startron - Junk; Sea-foam - not too bad_its breaks down too fast - does hold or stabilize nearly as long as you want it to....If anybody wants to use the best fuel system cleaner/ additive/ stabilizer ... BG is the only answer. I have been a tech for plenty of years and no other product compares. Its the best value for the dollar and does the best job. Dare you to prove me wrong. (this goes for diesel or gas)

  56. Corey Buford, GA

    Sta-bil - not bad; Phazzer - garbage; Startron - Junk; Sea-foam - not too bad_its breaks down too fast - does hold or stabilize nearly as long as you want it to....If anybody wants to use the best fuel system cleaner/ additive/ stabilizer ... BG is the only answer. I have been a tech for plenty of years and no other product compares. Its the best value for the dollar and does the best job. Dare you to prove me wrong. (this goes for diesel or gas)